The time my hair clogged the drain

Plumber cleaning hair from drain in bathroom

Plumber cleaning hair from drain in bathroom

I know and have experienced firsthand that you do not always need to hire a professional in all situations. One of these situations that I think you should absolutely hire a professional is when you need a plumber. I can tell you right now that you will save yourself a lot of time and money if you hire a professional rather than doing it by yourself. Sometimes when we may think we know what we are doing, we really do not. Sometimes we might even think we can do it because we read online how to and thought it looked easy, but that is also not the case either. I can see not hiring a professional in some situations okay, but not in one as serious as needing a plumber to come out and unclog a drain or fix leaking pipes. It is almost how some things are better left unsaid, some things are better left untouched, too.

In my very specific situation, I ran into the problem of a terribly clogged drain. It was not the first time that a problem arose for me that I thought I could easily handle and fix myself by looking up how-to’s online. I went out to the store, bought all of the supplies that I read I needed, and I went home and started to attempt to fix my problem. I thought I was doing everything correctly and it did not seem like there were any signs saying I was not. As far as I knew, I was just as much of a professional as someone that was actually trained to do the job! My issue was a clogged drain from my hair, so to fix the problem I read that I had to use a snake to get all of the hair out. After I finished my work with the clogged drain, I attempted to see if the problem was fixed. It turned out that I had not fixed the problem and so I went out and bought another snake to try again. This same scenario happened a couple of more times until I realized that all I was doing was wasting my time and a lot of my money.

Once I came to the realization that I was only wasting my time and money, I decided to call a plumbed to get the job done by a professional and the correct way. Unfortunately for me though, I had to wait a couple days for the plumber to even come out to fix my clogged drain. This was only more time wasted and more money wasted then needed to be due to me trying to fix the problem by myself. If you are ever in a situation where you think you could fix a serious problem because it looks easy online, you should probably just hire a professional instead. Plumbing issues are a lot more serious and difficult to fix than most people would think. This is why you should always hire a professional!

Why you should hire a professional plumber!

I know and have experienced firsthand that you do not always need to hire a professional in all situations. One of these situations that I think you should absolutely hire a professional is when you need a plumber. I can tell you right now that you will save yourself a lot of time and money if you hire a professional rather than doing it by yourself. Sometimes when we may think we know what we are doing, we really do not. Sometimes we might even think we can do it because we read online how to and thought it looked easy, but that is also not the case either. I can see not hiring a professional in some situations okay, but not in one as serious as needing a plumber to come out and unclog a drain or fix leaking pipes. It is almost how some things are better left unsaid, some things are better left untouched, too.

In my very specific situation, I ran into the problem of a terribly clogged drain. It was not the first time that a problem arose for me that I thought I could easily handle and fix myself by looking up how-to’s online. I went out to the store, bought all of the supplies that I read I needed, and I went home and started to attempt to fix my problem. I thought I was doing everything correctly and it did not seem like there were any signs saying I was not. As far as I knew, I was just as much of a professional as someone that was actually trained to do the job! My issue was a clogged drain from my hair, so to fix the problem I read that I had to use a snake to get all of the hair out. After I finished my work with the clogged drain, I attempted to see if the problem was fixed. It turned out that I had not fixed the problem and so I went out and bought another snake to try again. This same scenario happened a couple of more times until I realized that all I was doing was wasting my time and a lot of my money.

Once I came to the realization that I was only wasting my time and money, I decided to call a plumbed to get the job done by a professional and the correct way. I used Best Plumber Boca Raton. Unfortunately for me though, I had to wait a while for the plumber to even come out to fix my clogged drain. This was only more time wasted and more money wasted then needed to be due to me trying to fix the problem by myself. If you are ever in a situation where you think you could fix a serious problem because it looks easy online, you should probably just hire a professional instead. Plumbing issues are a lot more serious and difficult to fix than most people would think. This is why you should always hire a professional!

Be Kind Rewind | The Movie

bekindrewind

Smells Like the Best Movie Hits Compilation…Ever

Michel Gondry chucks out the rulebook and unleashes his clueless characters into a seemingly impossible filmmaking challenge; remake as many movie classics as possible. With bravado wit mixed with Blue Peter charm, it’s like the perfect covers album that pays homage to the good ol’ days where films weren’t all shiny teens and bland CGI. Without getting too weepy, Gondry also manages to squeeze in plenty of positive morals on the collective culture of film. Might not be essential viewing for those already upgraded to Blu-Ray but it’s definitely got love for you if you were born in the 80s.

Director: Michel Gondry
Main Cast: Jack Black, Mos Def, Danny Glover, Melonie Diaz

Cinema Release Date: 22nd February 2008

 Welcome to movie geek heaven, or a neglected video store in the rusting industrial town of Passaic to be more precise. It’s a place were staff and customers refuse the unending march of technology and the location of Michel Gondry’s nostalgic, communal experiment that reminds the audience of the simple fun of movies. After the dreamlike Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, Be Kind Rewind is the director’s most straightforward story yet, but still benefits from Gondry’s childlike imagination and sideways approach to filmmaking.

The Be Kind Rewind store has fallen on hard times and while the owner, Mr Fletcher (Glover), goes out to see what all the DVD fuss is about he leaves his shy assistant Mike (Def) in charge. It isn’t long before Mike’s friend and serial layabout Jerry (Black) lands himself in trouble at the nearby power plant and becomes magnetized, wiping all the store’s videos. With customers demanding their dose of movie classics, the pair begin a crazy scheme to re-shoot the stock and it isn’t long before the community are demanding their new ‘Sweded’ versions over the Hollywood originals.

One thing Jack Black’s always missed is a decent partner in crime and in Mos Def he’s found the perfect straightman. Their Laurel & Hardy relationship is well balanced so Black’s brash troublemaking mirrors Def’s reluctant mumbling and both put in honest, warm performances. Black especially calms down from previous roles and Jerry’s innocent racism makes for some subtle gags amongst the more slapstick atmosphere. The majority of the film sees the duo larking about and it’s great to watch thanks to their enthusiasm but largely due to Gondry’s innovative, DIY solutions to everyday filmmaking problems. From the tinsel used as the ‘streams’ in Ghostbusters to the car parts used as Robocop’s armour, each homemade version reminds the audience of the joys of filmmaking, the getting out there and doing it buzz much like Ed Wood’s disregard for traditional ‘rules’. Their take on Rush Hour 2 is the most original but Gondry’s way of shooting night scenes during the day is ingenious, invoking the frontiersmen spirit that must have driven the first directors back in the early 20th century to push techniques in new directions.

The success of Mike and Jerry’s creations soon radiates outwards from the store, revitalising the depressed community who share their zeal for movies and this is when the film really starts working. Enter ice queen Sigourney Weaver to lay down the cold law of copyright and it isn’t long before the locals, young and old, band together to save their unique corner of the world from fat cat corporations. Thankfully, Gondry keeps it grounded, avoiding getting too sugary but still producing a heart-warming, dewy-eyed ending that any film fan will understand. Be Kind Rewind is the sort of work simply not seen anymore, its old-fashioned values sit nicely alongside 80s retro, and will be a joy for anyone who pretended to be Peter Venkman when they were a kid.


Country of origin: USA
Running time: 101 mins

Storm Warning Interview

Return to Oz: Jamie Blanks Heads Home for Storm Warning

It’s been several years since Aussie horror director Jamie Blanks got his big break in Hollywood with Urban Legend and Valentine but the market was already saturated with franchises and remakes. Now back home, Blanks is going back to basics and capitalizing on the reinvigorated horror market given a boost by the global success of Wolf Creek. With the low budget Storm Warning he’s taken the genre back to its demented roots, combining it with a surreal humour missing from Hollywood’s more cynical output and Blanks talked to Napalm about being able to express his natural style…

interview

“As soon as I got a VCR it was all over,” remembers Blanks, “I’d just watch horror films round the clock. I saw John Carpenter’s The Fog and Halloween in the space of two weeks and was forever obsessed with the horror genre thereafter.” Horror was in this man’s blood and after film school the director quickly notched up several short films and an unofficial trailer for 1997’s I Know What You Did Last Summer. It was enough for him to get noticed by Hollywood producers and he was soon behind the camera on 1998’s Urban Legend, but this and Blanks’ follow-up, Valentine (2001), went largely unnoticed in a market packed with derivative slasher movies that were already a joke thanks to Scream and Scary Movie.

What followed was a 6 year absence from directing. “I just got a run of bad luck with the projects I was attaching myself to,” explains Blanks, “They seemed to get stuck in development hell waiting for actors to become available and all sorts of things. It ended up being a long sabbatical which I hadn’t planned.” During this period Blanks moved back to his home town of Melbourne to start a family but it wasn’t long before the horror genre began to shift up a gear into dark, visceral territory. “I watched the original Saw with an audience and if they can take stuff like that they’ve certainly toughened up a lot since the old days. I found that really hard to take, so sadistic, a great film but wow, anything goes now.”

Saw, along with Hostel, represented a new, more adult breed of horror movies. A return to the terrifying and nasty situations the hapless characters of the 70s and 80s found themselves in. No surprise then that Blanks was handed a script by legendary screenwriter Everett De Roche (Patrick, Roadgames) written more than 25 years ago which now had fresh appeal. “Like Straw Dogs or Deliverance, something really stripped down,” says Blanks of the Storm Warning script, “I liked the confined nature of the location and the limited number of characters, the simplicity of it. I thought it’d be fun to get my teeth into.”

The setup is a simple one; a city slicker couple get lost in a swamp and seek shelter in a farmhouse, not realising it’s owned by a trio of murderous bastards who return to do horrible things to them. With her bloke incapacitated it’s up to the Pia (Nadia Farès) to get them to safety even if it means offing their captors in increasingly bloody ways and Blanks relished the opportunity to let rip with the violence, “There was stuff I could do that you could never get away with on a studio movie. I always thought that by making my studio films first I missed out on my chance to be naughty and make something independent that pushed the envelope. So I went full-tilt with Storm Warning, where a girl can open up a can of whoop-ass on these freaks and send them back to oblivion. ”

With a gruesome anti-rape solution and a fiendish fishing wire trap, Blanks certainly found ways to increase the gore factor while also infusing it with an almost joyful malevolence, “It’s much more my sense of humour than my American films were able to be. Everett and I were in competition to come up with the most disgusting thing. The pinnacle was the dog eating [the entrails]. We were never going to top that! The effects blokes thought all their Christmases had come at once.” The warped bad guys also go a long way to making their deaths more satisfying, “I thought I’d make the characters so irredeemably bad, so awful that there’s nothing we can’t do to them that the audience would get upset by.”

The preserve of many a horror movie is the isolated location and Blanks wanted to make sure that visually the farmhouse summed-up the film’s overall feel, “That was entirely artificially created as a set on a sound stage,” says Blanks, “I gave my production designer a brief I wanted it to look like Tim Burton’s version of Australian gothic, slightly stylized but have an element of authenticity to it. I was going for a totally hyper-real style, hopefully that adds to the fun and cartoonish nature of it.” Storm Warning may be low budget but that didn’t stop Blanks giving it a gloomy yet sharp aesthetic, “Sometimes having no money’s actually a really good thing for a film, you use creativity rather than money to wash away your problems.”

Thanks to 2005’s Wolf Creek there is now a burgeoning horror industry in Australia, one Blanks is keen to contribute to and help define its identity, “There’s been a lot more production. For a long time there was just an assumption that those films didn’t really work in the market place. Wolf Creek demonstrated to people that you could actually make a profit with those movies. But I think one of the great things about the horror genre is that it doesn’t really matter where a film comes from, if the movie works it’ll travel all over the world.”

Blanks is keen to work with De Roche again and their next project is a remake of the screenwriter’s 1978 film Long Weekend. “We’ve both got the same wacky sense of humour and we both love the same movies,” says Blanks, “If Storm Warning’s a horror movie then The Long Weekend is much more of a thriller, the lead couple are the bad guys. It’s kind of unconventional to have unsympathetic protagonists in your story but I like to do some stuff that’s out of leftfield.” It certainly seems like Blanks has found a place to do just that.


Storm Warning premiered in the UK at last year’s Fright Fest in London and is released on DVD 21st April.

Starbucks Coffee Shop Review

I’ve found that no matter where I go, there is obviously a Starbucks to be found. What I have also found is that, no matter what the demographics of the neighborhood – I get the same experience at every single Starbucks. This isn’t a coincidence. I know it isn’t because I go into a McDonald’s in any city and I’m bound to get a difference experience that the previous one; guaranteed.

This shows me that the company has taken the customer experience (and customer satisfaction) to an entirely new level; one where everyone within the Starbucks Organization understands it and gets that it’s needed in order to be successful; and perhaps even happy at work. This experience is what causes individuals to pay $40 for a cup of coffee; okay, maybe we exaggerated a little bit. Either way, you know it’s more than a cup of coffee should cost and you still pay it because you know that when you go into a Starbucks you will get exactly the experience you expect.

When you go in you will see the same, familiar setup, the same color scheme, the same happy employees, the same assembly line of coffee creators and, at the end, the same cup and the same name of yours being called out once your order is ready.


When it comes to business, Starbucks is freakin’ nailing it!